notes.husk.org. scribblings by Paul Mison.

2014-09-22

The NSA’s website redirects HTTPS to HTTP: an act of symbolism?

text 17:59:14

httpshaming:

Going to https://www.nsa.gov/ will redirect you to http://www.nsa.gov/, meaning that the agency has purchased a valid SSL certificate merely to transparently downgrade all their visitors to HTTP.

Apparently, HTTPS Everywhere — a browser extension that forces your browser to land on HTTPS sites for sites known to support SSL — used to have a rule for nsa.gov to fight the NSA’s redirect to plaintext, by continually redirecting back to HTTPS, almost performing a low-grade DDoS against the NSA’s website.

2014-09-18

post/97828773634

photo 20:35:00
“all intersections are crosswalks” (via sfmuniverse)

“all intersections are crosswalks” (via sfmuniverse)

2014-09-16

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quote 23:31:33
“ The available music options are Light Classical, Environmental, Patriotic and Country. ”

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video 21:45:27

astormofquills:

You can never go home again. But I guess you can shop there.

This video is a much better excerpt of that scene from Grosse Pointe Blank.

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video 01:45:10

This, from Grosse Pointe Blank, is one of the greatest diegetic music jokes I know of.

2014-08-27

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photo 21:22:28
I was thinking about freeways the other day.
Recently, photos of Hayes Valley (in central San Francisco) before the freeway demolition have been doing the rounds. The Central Freeway used to pass through the area, flying over Octavia Street.
Now, Hayes Valley is desirable, full of fancy ice cream and brunch places, and generally a nice place to hang out, but as recently as fifteen years ago it was, frankly, a bit of a dump. Luckily, after the Embarcadero Freeway was demolished in the wake of suffering damage during the Lomo Prieta earthquake, SF residents had come to realise that these roads didn’t have to be there, and Octavia was the next to go.
The thing I realised last week is that this was only possible because the original freeway revolt, in the 1950s, stopped the entire plan from happening. If the Embarcadero Freeway had connected, as the map above shows, to Broadway and then the Golden Gate Bridge, the pressure to rebuild it would have been much greater.
Similarly, the Central Freeway spur was intended to connect to both the Panhandle Freeway and an expressway carrying 101 north along Van Ness. If those had been in place, pushing the freeway’s exit to street level to Market would have been impossible.
The thing is, SF still has loose ends and spurs. The remainder of the Central Freeway runs above 13th from I-80 to Market Street at Octavia, while I-280 ends abruptly at 4th and King, by the Caltrain station. The fact that the latter needs grade separation has led to feasibility studies in removing its flyovers, too.
In other words, it’s mainly thanks to the original freeway opponents that the incomplete system can now be unravelled bit by bit. Thanks, 1950s.
(Map source: Eric Fischer’s fantastic Flickr collection of San Francisco traffic plans. See also.)

I was thinking about freeways the other day.

Recently, photos of Hayes Valley (in central San Francisco) before the freeway demolition have been doing the rounds. The Central Freeway used to pass through the area, flying over Octavia Street.

Now, Hayes Valley is desirable, full of fancy ice cream and brunch places, and generally a nice place to hang out, but as recently as fifteen years ago it was, frankly, a bit of a dump. Luckily, after the Embarcadero Freeway was demolished in the wake of suffering damage during the Lomo Prieta earthquake, SF residents had come to realise that these roads didn’t have to be there, and Octavia was the next to go.

The thing I realised last week is that this was only possible because the original freeway revolt, in the 1950s, stopped the entire plan from happening. If the Embarcadero Freeway had connected, as the map above shows, to Broadway and then the Golden Gate Bridge, the pressure to rebuild it would have been much greater.

Similarly, the Central Freeway spur was intended to connect to both the Panhandle Freeway and an expressway carrying 101 north along Van Ness. If those had been in place, pushing the freeway’s exit to street level to Market would have been impossible.

The thing is, SF still has loose ends and spurs. The remainder of the Central Freeway runs above 13th from I-80 to Market Street at Octavia, while I-280 ends abruptly at 4th and King, by the Caltrain station. The fact that the latter needs grade separation has led to feasibility studies in removing its flyovers, too.

In other words, it’s mainly thanks to the original freeway opponents that the incomplete system can now be unravelled bit by bit. Thanks, 1950s.

(Map source: Eric Fischer’s fantastic Flickr collection of San Francisco traffic plans. See also.)

2014-08-23

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photo 00:50:23
mappeal, via criminalwisdom:

Inertial guidance module for the Peacekeeper ICBM, 1986

mappeal, via criminalwisdom:

Inertial guidance module for the Peacekeeper ICBM, 1986

2014-08-21

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photo 18:31:04
scanzen:

Űrtávközlési Földi Állomás (aka Interszputnyik Űrtávközlési és Műholdkövető Állomás), Taliándörögd. Magyar Posta kártyanaptár, 1978.
Intersputnik Space Communications and  Satellite Tracking Station, Taliándörögd, Hungary, 1978.

scanzen:

Űrtávközlési Földi Állomás (aka Interszputnyik Űrtávközlési és Műholdkövető Állomás), Taliándörögd. Magyar Posta kártyanaptár, 1978.

Intersputnik Space Communications and  Satellite Tracking Station, Taliándörögd, Hungary, 1978.

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photos 18:30:06

The New World Geebird & Bamby (via rachelbinxarchatlas):

”The New World” revisits anonymous places of the 20th century. It is set in a time characterized by the conflict of Modernist and Postmodernist convictions, its influence on later 20th century history, and ultimately, the world we live in today. 

On a formal level, this conflict defines the aesthetics of the collection. The interrelation of rational graphic design and anonymous photorealism reflects the contrast of manmade ideals and the acceptance of life in chaos. “The New World” is shaped by an original set of rules, metrics and processes. This enables the revelation of eclectic utopias that, for better or worse, withhold the definition of a photograph.

I’m not sure about the blurb, but I’m a sucker for typologies and modernist architecture.

2014-08-18

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quote 06:23:00
“ We made a lot of new elements and colors for the Futuron theme, but when we tested with kids, they were un-impressed, it was the mini-figures new diagonal print still with the space logo on it that all of them were impressed with. Kids like this kind of detail. ”

Jens Nygaard Knudsen, “creator of the mini-figure and LEGO space”, quoted in Mark Stafford’s interview, The Truth About Space, in BrickJournal #6. (You can see the first couple of pages of the interview on Issuu.)

(Originally posted on my embryonic Futuron blog.)

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