notes.husk.org. scribblings by Paul Mison.

2014-04-17

post/82949103832

photo 02:30:15
Voyager spacecraft diagram, from Wikimedia.
I’ve posted a version of this before, and there’s an alternative SVG rendering at Wikimedia, but the 1970s lettering makes this the definitive version as far as I’m concerned.
See also.

Voyager spacecraft diagram, from Wikimedia.

I’ve posted a version of this before, and there’s an alternative SVG rendering at Wikimedia, but the 1970s lettering makes this the definitive version as far as I’m concerned.

See also.

post/82949166899

photo 02:30:00
Voyager 2 20120613 04 by Apojove on Flickr.
Stephen Pakbaz is the designer of the Cuusoo Curiosity Rover, which has been almost continually sold out at the Lego shop since its January releae. He also has models of Voyager (above), Juno, and some of the ISS supply craft.
Previously.

Voyager 2 20120613 04 by Apojove on Flickr.

Stephen Pakbaz is the designer of the Cuusoo Curiosity Rover, which has been almost continually sold out at the Lego shop since its January releae. He also has models of Voyager (above), Juno, and some of the ISS supply craft.

Previously.

2014-04-16

post/82908857184

photo 18:48:39
Do What You Love, Love What You Do poster at Google X, from the Fast Company slideshow.
Miya Tokumitsu, In the Name of Love:

Superficially, DWYL is an uplifting piece of advice, urging us to ponder what it is we most enjoy doing and then turn that activity into a wage-generating enterprise. But why should our pleasure be for profit? Who is the audience for this dictum? Who is not?

Do What You Love, Love What You Do poster at Google X, from the Fast Company slideshow.

, In the Name of Love:

Superficially, DWYL is an uplifting piece of advice, urging us to ponder what it is we most enjoy doing and then turn that activity into a wage-generating enterprise. But why should our pleasure be for profit? Who is the audience for this dictum? Who is not?

post/82908226829

quote 18:40:00

“Science fiction” provides but a tiny porthole onto the vast strangeness of the future. When we imagine a “science fiction”-like future, I think we tend to picture completed worlds, flying cars, the shiny, floating towers of midcentury dreams.

We tend, in other words, to imagine future technological systems as readymade, holistic products that people will choose to adopt, rather than as the assembled work of countless different actors, which they’ve always really been. The futurist Scott Smith calls these ‘flat-pack futures,’ and they infect “science fictional” thinking.

2014-04-14

post/82633884014

photo 00:58:31
Sony 3.5” disk, from the April 1981 issue of Byte (at archive.org). The editorial was breathless:

Another Sony breakthrough is a new miniature floppy-disk system (see photo). Each disk measures 8.9cm (3½ inches) in diameter and holds over 800,000 bytes! The disk resides in a rigid housing for protection.

One of the first major users of the Sony disk was the Macintosh, but the decision was not without its drama.

Sony 3.5” disk, from the April 1981 issue of Byte (at archive.org). The editorial was breathless:

Another Sony breakthrough is a new miniature floppy-disk system (see photo). Each disk measures 8.9cm (3½ inches) in diameter and holds over 800,000 bytes! The disk resides in a rigid housing for protection.

One of the first major users of the Sony disk was the Macintosh, but the decision was not without its drama.

post/82633060368

photo 00:49:00
Byte, April 1981 (via migurski, kenyatta)

"Future Computers" is our cover theme this month and the subject of the editorial. Before you write to comment on our cover’s "unusual" design approach (created by artist Robert Tinney), keep in mind the proximity of April 1.

Elsewhere in the issue, A Closer Look at the TI Speak & Spell by Peter Vernon: “The author expands on Michael Rigsby’s September 1980 BYTE article.” You can read the issue in full at archive.org.

Byte, April 1981 (via migurski, kenyatta)

"Future Computers" is our cover theme this month and the subject of the editorial. Before you write to comment on our cover’s "unusual" design approach (created by artist Robert Tinney), keep in mind the proximity of April 1.

Elsewhere in the issue, A Closer Look at the TI Speak & Spell by Peter Vernon: “The author expands on Michael Rigsby’s September 1980 BYTE article.” You can read the issue in full at archive.org.

2014-04-12

post/82429501680

photo 01:12:01

My favorite patent illustration of the day: https://t.co/ToFdPrtgN3
— Mike Kuniavsky (@mikekuniavsky) March 28, 2014

post/82428975801

photo 01:05:04
Google Search autocomplete suggestions for “why should I trust” (ht @Bopuc)

Google Search autocomplete suggestions for “why should I trust” (ht @Bopuc)

post/82428654865

photo 01:00:00
Vogue Cover Averages, by Peter Leonard:

one of the things that usually jumps out at people when they look at this progression of covers are the years 1970 and 1980. Though clearly comprised of different covers, the net effect of the average pixel visualization is a ghostly, Platonic cover model who seems to be almost the same in her positioning, gaze, and even head angle

Vogue Cover Averages, by Peter Leonard:

one of the things that usually jumps out at people when they look at this progression of covers are the years 1970 and 1980. Though clearly comprised of different covers, the net effect of the average pixel visualization is a ghostly, Platonic cover model who seems to be almost the same in her positioning, gaze, and even head angle

2014-04-10

post/82301346831

quote 17:43:45
“ This is as good a time as any to point out that Bush painted his portraits, not just from photographs—a common enough practice as well as a long-established conceptual strategy, though I think only the former pertains here—but from the top search result on Google Images. Many photos were taken from the subject’s Wikipedia entry. Bush based his paintings on the literally first-to-surface, easiest-to-find photos of his subjects. ”

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