notes.husk.org. scribblings by Paul Mison.

2014-07-24

post/92746227204

photo 18:55:53
frankie-roberto:

Definitive* list of regional (i.e. long-distance) destinations which are permitted to be shown in UPPERCASE on motorway signs.
For some reason seeing ‘The NORTH’ etc has always struck me as oddly idiosyncratic and somewhat amusing.
From The Design and Use of Directional Informatory Signs (PDF)
* NORTH EAST is also allowed, but only to disambiguate when NORTH WEST is also used.

I always liked seeing these on trips, especially The NORTH and SCOTLAND.

frankie-roberto:

Definitive* list of regional (i.e. long-distance) destinations which are permitted to be shown in UPPERCASE on motorway signs.

For some reason seeing ‘The NORTH’ etc has always struck me as oddly idiosyncratic and somewhat amusing.

From The Design and Use of Directional Informatory Signs (PDF)

* NORTH EAST is also allowed, but only to disambiguate when NORTH WEST is also used.

I always liked seeing these on trips, especially The NORTH and SCOTLAND.

post/92745625929

photo 18:47:54
Mayflies, La Crosse, Wisconsin, from CityLab (via bluecloudsfloating)

Mayflies, La Crosse, Wisconsin, from CityLab (via bluecloudsfloating)

post/92744508489

photo 18:32:55
toffeemilkshake:

Yeah, I’m basically still 12 so these were first things I typed into this New York Times specific version for google zeitgeist. Looks like the NYT is finally coming out of some kind of 30 year profanity hiatus.

Now I’m wondering what that’d look like for the Guardian.

toffeemilkshake:

Yeah, I’m basically still 12 so these were first things I typed into this New York Times specific version for google zeitgeist. Looks like the NYT is finally coming out of some kind of 30 year profanity hiatus.

Now I’m wondering what that’d look like for the Guardian.

2014-07-22

post/92567395454

photos 22:41:01

likeafieldmouse (via notational):

Marco Cadioli - Squares with Concentric Circles

(Source: likeafieldmouse)

post/92566569534

quote 22:31:00
“ The reason sickness is undesirable is not that it causes distress or discomfort but that it results in what is often called “lost productivity”. This is a sinister and absurd notion, predicated on the greedy fallacy of counting chickens before they have hatched. “Workplace absence through sickness was reported to cost British business £32bn a year,” the researcher claimed in Metro: a normal way of phrasing things today, but one with curious implications. The idea seems to be that business already has that money even though it hasn’t earned it yet and employees who fail to maintain “productivity” as a result of sickness or other reasons are, in effect, stealing this as yet entirely notional sum from their employers. ”

Steven Poole: Why the cult of hard work is counter-productive (via toffeemilkshake)

In the US there are companies that take sick days and personal time off from the same pool of days. I had fifteen total in a year, and that’s regarded as pretty generous. Of course, if I actually did have anything that didn’t physically stop me getting in to work, I’d do so - it’s better for me to sit at my desk unproductive (and possibly infecting co-workers) than lose a holiday day.

Well done for reverse incentives there, free market capitalism.

post/92550071959

photo 19:11:33
City skylines, from Apple’s “Sticker" advert for the MacBook Air.
It’s interesting to me that this is a tacit acknowledgment that Apple devices are pretty bare and that most people like to customise them. Personally, I’m a no-sticker person, but the gallery on that page makes it clear that lots of others aren’t.

City skylines, from Apple’s “Sticker" advert for the MacBook Air.

It’s interesting to me that this is a tacit acknowledgment that Apple devices are pretty bare and that most people like to customise them. Personally, I’m a no-sticker person, but the gallery on that page makes it clear that lots of others aren’t.

post/92503411214

photo 05:49:04
Ladybird Leaders: Bridges, from an eBay auction.

Ladybird Leaders: Bridges, from an eBay auction.

2014-07-21

post/92453721579

photos 20:10:26

Three photos from my visit to Flåm in Norway, July 2010: the valley seen from a waterfall, the harbour, and the church of the old village behind a turf-roofed house in front.

The main reason I stopped there for a night between Bergen and Oslo was to ride Flamsbana, the railway that climbs over eight hundred metres in just twenty kilometres. It meant that i missed the Bergen-Myrdal section of the Bergensbanen, but I think it was the right decision.

post/92452756014

photos 19:58:55

flavorcountry:

helenadagmar:

Once the day winds down and boats stop hopping from place to place, the fjord waters become as still as glass and perfectly mirror whatever’s above it. It’s the biggest puddle I’ve ever seen.

Flåm, June 2014.

I have to do serious work to convince myself that the last picture isn’t actually a gateway to another reality,

I stopped in Flåm for just one night on my Norwegian trip in July 2010. As soon as I left I regretted that it hadn’t been for longer.

post/92445689974

photo 18:30:00
paglen:

Here’s the story behind the National Reconnaissance Office’s “Nothing is Beyond Our Reach” spy satellite patch. 

Documents on the NROL patch, thanks to Paul Szoldra’s Freedom of Information request.

paglen:

Here’s the story behind the National Reconnaissance Office’s “Nothing is Beyond Our Reach” spy satellite patch. 

Documents on the NROL patch, thanks to Paul Szoldra’s Freedom of Information request.

what

more

pages