notes.husk.org. scribblings by Paul Mison.

2014-04-03

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photo 01:44:38
Google Image Search thinks an airbase in Djibouti is like interior design.

Google Image Search thinks an airbase in Djibouti is like interior design.

2014-04-01

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photo 02:00:34
Computers Can Read Emotions Better Than You Can from Motherboard at Vice (via algopop, internet-of-dreams:

For a while now, facial analysis software has been able to distinguish between the six “basic categories” of emotion—happiness, surprise, anger, sadness, fear, and disgust. If you asked me to do the same, I could probably do it. But when you drill down into complex, compound facial expressions such as “happily surprised,” “fearfully angry,” “appalled,” “hatred,” and “awed,” I’d probably blow a couple of them. This computer doesn’t. In fact, it can decipher between 21 different “complex emotions.”

Computers Can Read Emotions Better Than You Can from Motherboard at Vice (via algopopinternet-of-dreams:

For a while now, facial analysis software has been able to distinguish between the six “basic categories” of emotion—happiness, surprise, anger, sadness, fear, and disgust. If you asked me to do the same, I could probably do it. But when you drill down into complex, compound facial expressions such as “happily surprised,” “fearfully angry,” “appalled,” “hatred,” and “awed,” I’d probably blow a couple of them. This computer doesn’t. In fact, it can decipher between 21 different “complex emotions.”

2014-01-06

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quote 21:18:00
“ Television stations learned many years ago the difference between maximizing perceived quality, on the one hand, and maximizing hours spent watching, on the other. Netflix has long since started making the same distinction: it wants to serve up a constant stream of content for you to be able to watch in vast quantities, rather than sending individual precious DVDs where you will be very disappointed if they fall below your expectations. ”

2014-01-01

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photo 06:05:55
algopop:

Scott Klein argues that journalists should learn to code to unlock stories hidden in the datasets of online activity waiting to be scraped.


He makes reference to this one story on the Wall Street Journal that revealed that chainstore Staples would provide different prices based on the physical location associated to your IP address. The WSJ explain their process, a big task that must have been automated:
The Journal simulated visits to Staples.com from all of the more than 42,000 U.S. ZIP Codes, testing the price of a Swingline stapler 20 times in each. In addition, the Journal tested more than 1,000 different products in 10 selected ZIP Codes, 10 times in each location.

algopop:

Scott Klein argues that journalists should learn to code to unlock stories hidden in the datasets of online activity waiting to be scraped.

He makes reference to this one story on the Wall Street Journal that revealed that chainstore Staples would provide different prices based on the physical location associated to your IP address. The WSJ explain their process, a big task that must have been automated:

The Journal simulated visits to Staples.com from all of the more than 42,000 U.S. ZIP Codes, testing the price of a Swingline stapler 20 times in each. In addition, the Journal tested more than 1,000 different products in 10 selected ZIP Codes, 10 times in each location.

2013-12-04

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video 19:14:08

bashford:

Volkswagen Golf GTI + Underworld have collaborated on a project that synchronises driving and music in real time. Play The Road generates music via a phone app that’s connected to the GTI’s onboard computer, reading the driver’s location and movements to compose music live.

As the video says, “app not commercially available”, and I don’t drive anyway, but this is interesting nonetheless (mainly because I’m a fan of Underworld, but still).

2013-10-23

On Autocomplete

text 09:32:29

Here’s an interesting set of observations on those UN Women print adverts I posted on Friday.

algopop:

"Actual Google search on 09/03/13" reads the small print on this poster campaign for UN Women. “When we came across these searches, we were shocked by how negative they were and decided we had to do something with them” says Christopher Hunt, the Art Director, but the shocking posters have not only raised issues concerning sexism, but also about the accountability of Google autocomplete. The Guardian responded with an ill-informed analysis of the mechanics of the autocomplete algorithm, while a more thorough response has come through the research community in the form of a blogpost by Anna Jobin of the Digital Humanities Lab at EPFL, Lausanne, who’s Phd is about our interactions with Google’s algorithms.  When provoking the question ‘who is in charge when algorithms are in charge?’ she states: 

I rather suspect a coordinated bunch of MRAs are to be blamed for the volume of said search terms – but that doesn’t mean Google is completely innocent. The question of accountability goes beyond a binary option of intentionality or complete innocence.

Unsurprisingly, Google doesn’t take any responsibility. It puts the blame on its own algorithms… as if the algorithms were beyond the company’s control.

slavin:

Funny, that.Doesn’t matter who, but when I first proposed a talk about algorithms to TED 3 years ago, there was a gatekeeper who asked, point-blank, who on earth would ever care or even understand what an algorithm is. It required great diplomacy to convince them that maybe a few people would care. It’s possible that by now, this person has been replaced with one.

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quote 08:47:40
“ What is near-future late-capitalist dystopian fiction but a world where there is no discernible difference between corporations, nations, sports teams, brands, and celebrities? ”

2013-10-02

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photo 23:41:02
coldbrain:

Gritty crime dramas.

The algorithms are revolting again.

coldbrain:

Gritty crime dramas.

The algorithms are revolting again.

2013-05-28

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photo 18:43:00
slavin:

algopop:

Google executive Eric Schimdt discusses Google concerns which include ongoing improvements to search algorithms to use artificial intelligence to deliver ‘truth’ rather than distorted results caused by ‘Google-Bombing’ and misleading marketing. In response other talkers suggest that perhaps the algorithms are worryingly given power to establish truths. That conversation happens around minute 30. 

I remember pitching this basic idea four years ago to Someone Prominent Who Decides What People Hear, and I remember him saying: the thing is, there is not really anyone besides you who will be interested in that.Which is a reminder that when decisions were made entirely by humans, that wasn’t so great, either. 

If you’d rather have a copy of the file to keep, Start the Week has a podcast. (Apparently James Bridle’s Under The Shadow Of The Drone is also discussed.)

slavin:

algopop:

Google executive Eric Schimdt discusses Google concerns which include ongoing improvements to search algorithms to use artificial intelligence to deliver ‘truth’ rather than distorted results caused by ‘Google-Bombing’ and misleading marketing. In response other talkers suggest that perhaps the algorithms are worryingly given power to establish truths. That conversation happens around minute 30. 

I remember pitching this basic idea four years ago to Someone Prominent Who Decides What People Hear, and I remember him saying: the thing is, there is not really anyone besides you who will be interested in that.

Which is a reminder that when decisions were made entirely by humans, that wasn’t so great, either. 

If you’d rather have a copy of the file to keep, Start the Week has a podcast. (Apparently James Bridle’s Under The Shadow Of The Drone is also discussed.)

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quote 02:14:14
“ Pan’s legislation also addresses other anti-consumer practices by prohibiting the use of robotic ticket-buying software, or “bots,” which bombard online box offices with thousands of simultaneous purchase requests thereby gobbling up the best seats and preventing the average fan from obtaining tickets. ”
Legislation Gives Customers a Break at the Box Office, a press release from Perry Communications Group on California Assembly member Dr Richard Pan’s AB 329, which (amongst other things) bans automated ticket purchasing.

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