notes.husk.org. scribblings by Paul Mison.

2013-09-11

post/60941113056

quote 17:32:00
“ The other thing it reminds me of is a guy I met in Paris, who told me that he thinks that, for the amateur astronomer, the most important instrument is not the telescope, but the automobile, because you have to have a car to drive somewhere dark enough to see anything. ”

Paul Bogard, interviewed for In Search of Darkness by Nicola Twilley and Geoff Manaugh, published by Venue (via)

It’s a great look at the lack of true darkness these days, and the comment above is certainly true- having a telescope in London, and no car to move it with, it was only useful for the Moon and planets.

2013-07-26

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quote 18:31:34
“ India’s army reportedly spent six months watching “Chinese spy drones” violating its air space, only to find out they were actually Jupiter and Venus. ”

2013-02-19

post/43505029156

photo 20:23:26
toffeemilkshake:


Every meteorite fall on earth mapped
It’s amazing how metorites seem attracted to centers of human population and never ever fall in the sea.


Of course, the name of the graphic should be “every recorded meteorite fall on earth, mapped”.

See also: Astronomers lose access to military data, Nature, June 2009:


The change is a blow to the astronomers and planetary scientists who used the information to track space rocks, especially those that burn up over the oceans or in other remote locations. “These systems are extremely useful,” says Peter Brown, an astronomer at the University of Western Ontario in London, Canada. “I think the scientific community benefited enormously.”


The USAF later said the data would be made available again, but I don’t know if that happened. If it did, it may well be a better source than the data the Guardian worked from.

toffeemilkshake:

Every meteorite fall on earth mapped

It’s amazing how metorites seem attracted to centers of human population and never ever fall in the sea.

Of course, the name of the graphic should be “every recorded meteorite fall on earth, mapped”.

See also: Astronomers lose access to military data, Nature, June 2009:

The change is a blow to the astronomers and planetary scientists who used the information to track space rocks, especially those that burn up over the oceans or in other remote locations. “These systems are extremely useful,” says Peter Brown, an astronomer at the University of Western Ontario in London, Canada. “I think the scientific community benefited enormously.”

The USAF later said the data would be made available again, but I don’t know if that happened. If it did, it may well be a better source than the data the Guardian worked from.

(via toffeemilkshake)

2012-09-22

2012-06-04

post/24426845052

photo 23:03:26
An 1882 map by Richard A Proctor showing the cones of visibility of the 2012 transit of Venus (which happens tomorrow). It’s remarkable partly as it’s so well designed, and partly as it’s over a hundred years old but matches the modern map.

An 1882 map by Richard A Proctor showing the cones of visibility of the 2012 transit of Venus (which happens tomorrow). It’s remarkable partly as it’s so well designed, and partly as it’s over a hundred years old but matches the modern map.

2012-05-07

post/22587871052

photo 15:32:11
Studio Parris Wakefield:

Tasked with the brief of ‘deep space and nebulae’, Howard Wakefield researched through the collection of Nasa imagery at SpaceImages. While tempted with a nebula called Factory, its name was too good to be true, for it didn’t compare with the more expansive deep blue nebula of Hubble NGC 346 SMC. Peter Saville was keen to see how it could be transformed from being purely documentary, so suggested an inverted, monochrome version.

Studio Parris Wakefield:

Tasked with the brief of ‘deep space and nebulae’, Howard Wakefield researched through the collection of Nasa imagery at SpaceImages. While tempted with a nebula called Factory, its name was too good to be true, for it didn’t compare with the more expansive deep blue nebula of Hubble NGC 346 SMC. Peter Saville was keen to see how it could be transformed from being purely documentary, so suggested an inverted, monochrome version.

2012-04-19

2012-04-14

post/21064401457

quote 04:36:16
“ In our risk-adverse, crime-ridden world, the wilderness of the sky is becoming a lost frontier. Meanwhile, with every visible light we leave on down here, starlight vanishes and a little piece of magic is gone from our grey world. ”

2012-04-12

post/20929792635

quote 00:21:26

Some 53% of those who joined a recent star count failed to see more than 10 stars in the Orion constellation. That had decreased only very slightly from 54% since 2007, the Campaign to Protect Rural England and the Campaign for Dark Skies said.

Fewer than one in 10 said they could see between 21 and 30 stars, and just 2% of people had truly dark skies, seeing 31 or more stars.

The information was gathered as part of the annual Star Count survey, which was held across two weeks in January and February this year. Almost 1,000 people in different locations around the country took part. Participants were instructed to pick a clear night to count the number of stars in the constellation of Orion.

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