notes.husk.org. scribblings by Paul Mison.

2013-08-05

post/57448510879

quote 20:36:01
“ In the Atlantic alone, shark bites have caused the failure of four segments of cable, which is the main artery for global voice and computer communications. And British telephone officials monitoring the installation of the fiber-optic network that will link the United States to Japan and Guam are also reporting troubles with gnawing sharks. The attacks have caused some delays in laying cable, and a single bite on a deep-sea line, which is about the size of a garden hose, can cost $250,000 or more to fix. There is a benefit, however. In studying ways to limit damage from the attacks, the telephone companies are providing marine scientists with valuable new data on sharks and specimens of previously unknown species. ”
Phone Company Finds Sharks Cutting In - an article from the New York Times in June 1987, via this amazing article at Burrito Justice about, well, telecoms of all sorts. Just read the damn thing.

2013-07-26

post/56535476953

quote 19:54:05
“ But [NSA director General Keith] Alexander’s second act of declassification was much more interesting. [General Michael] Hayden pointed to Alexander’s comments about Brazil, and his point about not being interested in the communications of Brazilians. He asked me to think about the geography of Brazil, which bulges out eastward into the Atlantic Ocean. I still didn’t understand. “That’s where the transatlantic cables come ashore,” he finally explained. ”
 for the New Yorker, What the N.S.A. Wants in Brazil (via iamdanw)

(via iamdanw)

2012-03-27

post/20012404863

photo 17:38:00
The Cable & Wireless Giant Circle Map of 1945, photographed by iamdanw.
There’s a neater version at “Along What Dimension Is Cyberspace”, a post on what looks at a quick glance to be the fascinating (if slightly neglected) refractal site. (Again, thanks to Dan W for the pointer.)
It’s interesting comparing this decorative, slightly off-centred polar azimuthal map to the Pan Am route map, made just twenty years later, that I posted earlier. For example, the Empire and Dominions (as they then were) are shown in red, whereas Pan Am leaves the entire world off-white, and there’s far more labelling. Of course, both have the handy property of showing great circles (other than the Equator) as straight lines. 

The Cable & Wireless Giant Circle Map of 1945, photographed by iamdanw.

There’s a neater version at “Along What Dimension Is Cyberspace”, a post on what looks at a quick glance to be the fascinating (if slightly neglected) refractal site. (Again, thanks to Dan W for the pointer.)

It’s interesting comparing this decorative, slightly off-centred polar azimuthal map to the Pan Am route map, made just twenty years later, that I posted earlier. For example, the Empire and Dominions (as they then were) are shown in red, whereas Pan Am leaves the entire world off-white, and there’s far more labelling. Of course, both have the handy property of showing great circles (other than the Equator) as straight lines. 

2012-03-12

post/19196958583

quote 21:28:05
“ The demands are such that the 220 or so milliseconds it takes to reach Tokyo from London by maritime routes is now too long for some. Cloud computing, gaming, Skype, and financial trading are badly affected by “latency”, or delays in transmission. Demand for ultra-low latency connections is helping to drive a surge in construction. Four routes have recently opened up across the Asian continent and companies are selling links that will get your data packet to Tokyo in just 194 milliseconds. ”
Frank Pope, in 20,000 terabytes under the sea, which somehow I got at through a gap in The Times paywall. (via)

2011-05-28

2009-09-03

post/178885031

photo 17:40:41
One for buildingservicesporn? (Photo: Michael Appleton for The New York Times.)

One for buildingservicesporn? (Photo: Michael Appleton for The New York Times.)

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