notes.husk.org. scribblings by Paul Mison.

2012-04-08

post/20687546968

photo 02:56:29
A few weeks ago, I posted some screenshots from Aliens that I thought might show a touch screen. Sadly, during the overdue re-watching of the films, I saw that instead Ripley is actually controlling the display with a joystick.
Ah well. File this one as another case of science fiction not having enough imagination when it comes to computers.

A few weeks ago, I posted some screenshots from Aliens that I thought might show a touch screen. Sadly, during the overdue re-watching of the films, I saw that instead Ripley is actually controlling the display with a joystick.

Ah well. File this one as another case of science fiction not having enough imagination when it comes to computers.

2012-03-29

post/20120506812

quote 17:45:00
“ At the risk of seeming difficult, he wanted the video to be shown exactly as he’d planned it, down to the IKEA couches. “The Clock” was a twenty-four-hour video with a twenty-four-page instruction manual. ”

How Christian Marclay created “The Clock” in The New Yorker.

The person who is happy to appropriate the work of other artists himself demands control over how his piece is shown. Hmm.

2011-01-08

Permanence, Discoverability, and Control

text 22:26:00

I stumbled upon this post by quietbabylon, called “For Sufficiently Small Values of ‘Permanent’”, which I’ve chosen to sum up with these paragraphs:

Anil Dash’s post is about the importance of putting your clever/important ideas in a medium other than Twitter. Quick summary: There are a lot of good ideas in circulation on Twitter, but if you don’t put them somewhere like a blog, they are liable to be lost forever.

Blogs used to be the poster children of ephemera. It took the rise of even more ephemeral media (status updates and Twitter posts) for blogs to seem permanent. But blogs are no more permanent today than they were five or ten years ago. See also: dead Geocities, dying Delicious, and constantly ailing Tumblr.

What blogs and website have that Twitter lacks is rediscoverability. Twitter’s search is incomplete, missing what I’d think were basic things like searching a person’s timeline or limiting the scope to a list of accounts. On top of that, while the posts aren’t lost, we do lose the ability to search past 3,200 posts into the past—I needed Google to find that Dorsey tweet.

This is true, and far from unimportant, but there’s another thing that blogs tend to have that Twitter doesn’t: control.

If you own (although as the post notes, they’re strictly rented for a period from one to ten years) your own URL, and have a copy of your data, then you have a lot of control over your site. That’s most obviously true for a self-hosted Movable Type or Wordpress account, where you have the database and can edit the software yourself, but it’s also true even for Tumblr or Blogger. When Vox shut down, I lost control over the blech.vox.com domain, whereas if and when Tumblr closes, I can repoint the notes.husk.org cname to somewhere else, and (providing I can either replicate or redirect the /posts/id mapping) nobody will be able to notice the difference. (This isn’t just hypothetical, either: Tom Insam recently posted code that did just that.)

Discoverability is certainly important (and Tumblr’s archive pages are generally good for this), but a certain level of control is useful too.

what

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