notes.husk.org. scribblings by Paul Mison.

2014-02-11

2014-02-03

2014-01-22

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photos 02:02:13

Wallace Henning:

I think these must be the coolest beer mats I have ever seen!

The fact that they are printed in day glow colours and the design is so simple.

Why would you promote fibre optics on a beer mat? Where were they put? Who were they aimed at? Strange.

Nice though.

Mmm Helvetica.

2013-12-17

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photos 20:10:39

I’ve already posted some scans of Design Drawing One by John Rolfe, taken from the Serendipity Project, but I returned to it because I wanted to quote Wayne Burrows' commentary:

…the intention here is clearly to present a selection of neutral design exercises for students to carry out, but the result also serves as a kind of time-capsule of probably the last historical moment in which the post-war settlement felt securely grounded.

The year that this set of exercises was published saw Margaret Thatcher take the leadership of the Conservative Party with free market ideologues like Keith Joseph at her side. We’re often reminded about the Labour Party’s difficulties with Militant left groups during the later 1970s and early 1980s: what’s less often noted is that the Conservative Party had already been taken over by its own Militant Tendencies in 1975: bent on scrapping the settlement consolidated in 1945 in favour of a return to the free market Liberalism that had preceded it, largely discredited by two world wars and the long Depression of the 1930s. In 2011, it looks as though, having denied the lessons of that history, today’s advocates of neo-Liberalism are determined to have us repeat it.

2013-12-10

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photo 21:36:39
A screen capture from Avatar, from MIT’s MAS 565 course blog post, Why Scifi Gets The Blues:

What they don’t mention but supports their argument  is that the material science to create blue phosphors wasn’t economically feasible until just before 2000. … So, yes, blue lasers, blue LEDs, in essence the color blue itself, used optically WAS indeed futuristic.
The second thing they don’t bring up is the actual physiology of the eye. The human eye sees blue the LEAST. … When designing and animating Science Fiction interfaces you can use blue to keep the action on the actors and not let what is on the display steal focus.

A screen capture from Avatar, from MIT’s MAS 565 course blog post, Why Scifi Gets The Blues:

What they don’t mention but supports their argument  is that the material science to create blue phosphors wasn’t economically feasible until just before 2000. … So, yes, blue lasers, blue LEDs, in essence the color blue itself, used optically WAS indeed futuristic.

The second thing they don’t bring up is the actual physiology of the eye. The human eye sees blue the LEAST. … When designing and animating Science Fiction interfaces you can use blue to keep the action on the actors and not let what is on the display steal focus.

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photo 21:33:09
Four science fiction film screengrabs (from Galaxy Quest, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, Supernova, and. Fantastic 4), as seen on the page for 99% Invisible’s episode Future Screens are Mostly Blue:

why is blue the chosen color? Noessel posits that, because blue is so rare in nature (if you discount the sky and the ocean, which are arguably not blue) there’s something fundamentally mystical, unnatural, and inhuman about it.

Four science fiction film screengrabs (from Galaxy Quest, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the GalaxySupernova, and. Fantastic 4), as seen on the page for 99% Invisible’s episode Future Screens are Mostly Blue:

why is blue the chosen color? Noessel posits that, because blue is so rare in nature (if you discount the sky and the ocean, which are arguably not blue) there’s something fundamentally mystical, unnatural, and inhuman about it.

2013-12-05

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photo 21:00:32
A third-party guide to the Economist’s chart style, via toffeemilkshake.

A third-party guide to the Economist’s chart style, via toffeemilkshake.

2013-12-04

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photos 20:11:00

ghosts-in-the-tv, via toffeemilkshake:

Design Drawing One by John Rolfe, (EUP, 1975)

BT Tower? The British Rail logo? Pylons? Obviously this one was getting an instant reblog.

2013-12-03

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photo 04:07:21
Misha Black’s  entrance to the What Industrial Design Means section of Britain Can Make It, 1946, from the VADS design archive:

The first bay was the Introduction, marked by a huge 13 feet (4 metres) high fibrous-plaster egg to attract visitors’ eyes. The title of the section was projected onto its surface. Painted onto the wall alongside the egg was a 24 feet (3 metres 65 centimetres) long mural which depicted machines which produced eggcups.

Misha Black’s  entrance to the What Industrial Design Means section of Britain Can Make It, 1946, from the VADS design archive:

The first bay was the Introduction, marked by a huge 13 feet (4 metres) high fibrous-plaster egg to attract visitors’ eyes. The title of the section was projected onto its surface. Painted onto the wall alongside the egg was a 24 feet (3 metres 65 centimetres) long mural which depicted machines which produced eggcups.

2013-12-01

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photo 21:28:00
Standard C60 by Jubru. From Tape Cassette Inserts, a Flickr set (via things)

Standard C60 by Jubru. From Tape Cassette Inserts, a Flickr set (via things)

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