notes.husk.org. scribblings by Paul Mison.

2014-07-09

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video 18:08:13

8bitfuture (via natashacarolan):

After several years of shutting down production lines in chip fabrication facilities, the Japanese electronics giant [Fujitsu] is turning its sterile, dust free factory into a hydroponic lettuce farm.

edit: Have updated the video to a working link, it’s in Japanese now but you can still catch an English version here.

2014-06-20

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quote 21:08:38
“ That system of the world was invented. It’s not really natural. To imagine that capitalism is not subject to deconstruction, reinvention or critique in maximum happy imagination seems a little silly. If disruption is your mantra – why not go all the way? ”
Matt Jones in Maximum Happy Imagination, commenting on Marc Andreeson’s posts about abundance.

2014-05-19

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photos 18:44:48

stml:

Four images of Jane Jetson looking vaguely dissatisfied with the future. Last image is a gem: Jane puts on a video-calling mask to hide her unmade-up face from the caller.

2014-04-16

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quote 18:40:00

“Science fiction” provides but a tiny porthole onto the vast strangeness of the future. When we imagine a “science fiction”-like future, I think we tend to picture completed worlds, flying cars, the shiny, floating towers of midcentury dreams.

We tend, in other words, to imagine future technological systems as readymade, holistic products that people will choose to adopt, rather than as the assembled work of countless different actors, which they’ve always really been. The futurist Scott Smith calls these ‘flat-pack futures,’ and they infect “science fictional” thinking.

2014-03-27

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photos 01:14:50

Make Architect’s Stansted Airport concept/masterplan:

Make Architects is leading a multi-disciplinary team of experts to expand Stansted Airport to a new international hub, 25 minutes from central London. In July 2013, we submitted a strategic vision to the Airports Commission with proposals to extend the airport to a 4-runway hub.

I’d be amazed if it happens, but it makes more sense than the Boris-approved plan for an airport off the Essex marshes.

2014-02-27

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quote 19:45:47
“ Embracing this inevitability, the makers of BroApp argue that “The pace of technological change is past the point where it’s possible for us to reject it!” ”

2014-02-10

2014-02-06

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quote 21:17:11
“ Years ago, I identified Robocop, minus the specific robotic cops (which seemed impractically designed), as the portrayal of the future from 80s science fiction most likely to turn out to be accurate. With the decay of Detroit, the continued meshing of private and public, the widening gap between rich and poor, the heightening divide between the clean, corporate, orderly America and the dirty world of the declining American city, the ever-building corporate control of American government in general and city planning in particular, the rise of mediocre, oversexualized schlub/hotty entertainments, and even the development of automated military and law enforcement capabilities, it seems pretty close to the mark. ”

fenzel in another Overthinking It piece, this time on RoboCop: The American Tragic Hero.

This paragraph pretty much nails it, sadly, and it’s already five years old and if anything things seem to be getting worse rather than better.

2014-02-04

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photo 21:31:16
joshuanguyen:

naveen:

What I love about ‘Her’.




The future city of Los Angeles, where he lives, borrows designs and inspiration from places like Tokyo, Hong Kong and Shanghai. I have no doubt that is what all cities of the future will look like: endless sprawl, big open spaces, pathways connecting buildings that are separate from street-level, building up with more skyscrapers. I loved that he never once took a car; it was always public transit. (I believe I caught one taxi in the background in the whole movie).

Spot on. Have a few things to add once I wrap my mind around it.

As I noted earlier, like Blade Runner thirty years ago, Her makes Los Angeles a vertical city, when it’s really not at the moment. In Rayner Banham’s superlative Los Angeles - The Architecture Of Four Ecologies he describes how the city is flatter and more sprawled than older cities.
Written nearly half a century ago, new American cities don’t generally look like Shanghai, or even New York- they look like LA. Phoenix, Atlanta, Las Vegas, Dallas Fort Worth, and the other rapidly growing southern and south-western metropolises are vast flat expanses, tied together by freeways.
Globally, large African and South American cities may be dense, but it’s more typically slum-packed closeness than the exclusive luxury apartments everyone in Her seems to effortlessly own.
I’d like to think that the future city is vertical, and that its inhabitants can rely on public transport to get around, but sadly I don’t see the world moving that way. 

joshuanguyen:

naveen:

What I love about ‘Her’.

The future city of Los Angeles, where he lives, borrows designs and inspiration from places like Tokyo, Hong Kong and Shanghai. I have no doubt that is what all cities of the future will look like: endless sprawl, big open spaces, pathways connecting buildings that are separate from street-level, building up with more skyscrapers. I loved that he never once took a car; it was always public transit. (I believe I caught one taxi in the background in the whole movie).

Spot on. Have a few things to add once I wrap my mind around it.

As I noted earlier, like Blade Runner thirty years ago, Her makes Los Angeles a vertical city, when it’s really not at the moment. In Rayner Banham’s superlative Los Angeles - The Architecture Of Four Ecologies he describes how the city is flatter and more sprawled than older cities.

Written nearly half a century ago, new American cities don’t generally look like Shanghai, or even New York- they look like LA. Phoenix, Atlanta, Las Vegas, Dallas Fort Worth, and the other rapidly growing southern and south-western metropolises are vast flat expanses, tied together by freeways.

Globally, large African and South American cities may be dense, but it’s more typically slum-packed closeness than the exclusive luxury apartments everyone in Her seems to effortlessly own.

I’d like to think that the future city is vertical, and that its inhabitants can rely on public transport to get around, but sadly I don’t see the world moving that way. 

2013-12-05

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quote 20:30:00
“ Is Foursquare a check-in app, a guidebook, an API or? You can only be one — I learned that hard lesson from my days at Flickr, where we also had three options: a social network, a media platform or a photo layer for the internet. ”
Joshua Nguyen in Thoughts on Foursquare, which starts as a discussion of the Techcrunch article of their new version, but which expands into a bigger, and very worthwhile, examination of what Foursquare’s future is.

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