notes.husk.org. scribblings by Paul Mison.

2014-03-05

post/78671828764

photos 19:54:41

abigailbrady, via toffeemilkshake:

drtonykeen:

I’ll take him to Baker Street - Sherlock will know what to do with him.

THORNINGTON CRESCENT LIVES.

Reblogged for truth.

(via toffeemilkshake)

2014-02-04

post/75611911344

photo 20:10:51
London Underground line colours, from the TfL Colour Standard (Issue 3) PDF. (More design standards.)

London Underground line colours, from the TfL Colour Standard (Issue 3) PDF. (More design standards.)

2014-01-24

post/74410571987

quote 20:18:49
“ Other ideas included making the Circle line on the London tube circular again ”

That’s from UKIP’s 2010 manifesto, which now-leader Nigel Farage has dismissed as “drivel” and said he “didn’t read”, despite being at a launch event for it in London, taken from a Guardian article leading on his calls for UK gun laws to be relaxed.

Other policies in the 2010 manifesto included calls to “ban offshore windfarms amid fears they could hurt fish”, “repaint trains in traditional colours” and “bringing back ‘proper dress’ at the theatre”.

All of this just adds to the question of how this idiot keeps getting invited on to Question Time.

2013-12-10

post/69605018365

photo 18:22:08
travelbetterlondon:

What we said in the 80s about how to travel better in London: why turn your music down?
Keep your personal stereo personal!, by Tim Demuth, 1987. ©TfL London Transport Museum collection

travelbetterlondon:

What we said in the 80s about how to travel better in London: why turn your music down?

Keep your personal stereo personal!, by Tim Demuth, 1987. ©TfL London Transport Museum collection

2013-10-16

post/64228552583

photo 20:48:02
A hero shot of Robert Macfarlane in a North London reservoir, from his interview (and exploration) with Bradley Garrett, author of Explore Everything: Place-Hacking the City.
I read Macfarlane’s book on mountaineering, Mountains of the Mind, a few years ago, and I’m looking forward to getting to his more recent The Old Ways, but the idea to pair a writer more used to exploring nature with Garrett, an urban explorer par excellence, was genius. The spark throws up lots of good quotes.

 Just as certain climbers prefer granite to gritstone, and certain cavers prefer wet systems to dry ones, the explorers have their specialisms: the bunkerologists, the asylum seekers, the skywalkers, the builderers, the track-runners, the drainers. Most people start out in ruins, though: these tend to be the easiest sites to access, and the aesthetic payoffs – the pathos of abandonment, the material residue of inscrutable histories – are rapid.


Photography is important to the adventurers too, they specialise in the “hero shot”: the lone explorer seen from behind on the rim of a building or bridge, or heavily backlit (partly to preserve anonymity) and framed in a storm-drain or archway. Such images unmistakably have their origin in Caspar David Friedrich’s icon of Romanticism, Wanderer Above the Sea of Fog (1818): the dark frock-coated traveller atop his peak, with the mists of unknowing spread out beneath him.

From London Bridge, Garrett took me on a haphazard walk through the City. He had climbed pretty much every major building we passed. … The Gherkin went up before Garrett arrived in London, to his enduring regret. On the whole, he prefers mid-level structures to skyscrapers: “Something like the Shard has no relationship to the city. From its summit, you look down and London resembles a giant circuit-board. It all seems chilly and lifeless from up there.”

[Garrett] decided to become an academic geographer instead. UE became [his] exclusive ethnographic focus. His research method was extreme and immersive. He spent four years embedded with a group of London-based explorers – “the scribe of the tribe” – as they enjoyed what he now describes as a “golden age” of UE. … Among the results of his research were a doctorate from the University of London; a gallery of remarkable photographs; arrest by British Transport Police (BTP); the battering-down of his front door and confiscation of his computers, phone and passport; a court battle; a post-doc at Oxford; and now the book of his PhD.


Garrett’s attempts to reach the [London Underground’s] ghost stations form the most controversial episodes of the book. These actions led eventually to his arrest and the forced dispersal of the LCC (bail conditions currently prevent them from communicating). His trial is ongoing. Transport for London, apparently fearing copycatism, have recently threatened his publisher, Verso Books, with legal action over the publication of “illegally obtained information” in Explore Everything.

The interview is well worth a read in full (yes, there are a lot of quotes above, but it’s barely scratching the surface) and I’m looking forward to getting a look at the book itself.

A hero shot of Robert Macfarlane in a North London reservoir, from his interview (and exploration) with Bradley Garrett, author of Explore Everything: Place-Hacking the City.

I read Macfarlane’s book on mountaineering, Mountains of the Mind, a few years ago, and I’m looking forward to getting to his more recent The Old Ways, but the idea to pair a writer more used to exploring nature with Garrett, an urban explorer par excellence, was genius. The spark throws up lots of good quotes.

 Just as certain climbers prefer granite to gritstone, and certain cavers prefer wet systems to dry ones, the explorers have their specialisms: the bunkerologists, the asylum seekers, the skywalkers, the builderers, the track-runners, the drainers. Most people start out in ruins, though: these tend to be the easiest sites to access, and the aesthetic payoffs – the pathos of abandonment, the material residue of inscrutable histories – are rapid.

Photography is important to the adventurers too, they specialise in the “hero shot”: the lone explorer seen from behind on the rim of a building or bridge, or heavily backlit (partly to preserve anonymity) and framed in a storm-drain or archway. Such images unmistakably have their origin in Caspar David Friedrich’s icon of Romanticism, Wanderer Above the Sea of Fog (1818): the dark frock-coated traveller atop his peak, with the mists of unknowing spread out beneath him.

From London Bridge, Garrett took me on a haphazard walk through the City. He had climbed pretty much every major building we passed. … The Gherkin went up before Garrett arrived in London, to his enduring regret. On the whole, he prefers mid-level structures to skyscrapers: “Something like the Shard has no relationship to the city. From its summit, you look down and London resembles a giant circuit-board. It all seems chilly and lifeless from up there.”

[Garrett] decided to become an academic geographer instead. UE became [his] exclusive ethnographic focus. His research method was extreme and immersive. He spent four years embedded with a group of London-based explorers – “the scribe of the tribe” – as they enjoyed what he now describes as a “golden age” of UE. … Among the results of his research were a doctorate from the University of London; a gallery of remarkable photographs; arrest by British Transport Police (BTP); the battering-down of his front door and confiscation of his computers, phone and passport; a court battle; a post-doc at Oxford; and now the book of his PhD.

Garrett’s attempts to reach the [London Underground’s] ghost stations form the most controversial episodes of the book. These actions led eventually to his arrest and the forced dispersal of the LCC (bail conditions currently prevent them from communicating). His trial is ongoing. Transport for London, apparently fearing copycatism, have recently threatened his publisher, Verso Books, with legal action over the publication of “illegally obtained information” in Explore Everything.

The interview is well worth a read in full (yes, there are a lot of quotes above, but it’s barely scratching the surface) and I’m looking forward to getting a look at the book itself.

2013-10-14

post/64053714048

photo 22:32:54
Design for Shopping poster for London Transport, 1935. Design by O’Keeffe
via Mikey Ashworth, c86

Design for Shopping poster for London Transport, 1935. Design by O’Keeffe

via Mikey Ashworthc86

2013-10-12

post/63827707215

quote 16:33:00
“ Incidentally, the 3D model was created using a 3D printer. I cannot imagine anything more likely to drive sales of 3D printer through the roof than TfL releasing a range of 3D model templates of their tube stations for London’s transport geeks to make in their homes. ”

2013-03-22

post/46023883850

photo 23:01:47
It turns out that Andrew Godwin has coded a 3d visualisation of several London Underground stations, including King’s Cross St Pancras.
If you’re having trouble wrapping your head around the station diagram, you could find being able to turn the thing around and refocus on different platforms useful.

It turns out that Andrew Godwin has coded a 3d visualisation of several London Underground stations, including King’s Cross St Pancras.

If you’re having trouble wrapping your head around the station diagram, you could find being able to turn the thing around and refocus on different platforms useful.

2013-01-09

post/40123440382

video 22:40:48

I thought I’d posted the fantastic 1960s Automatic Fare Collection… And You film before, but apparently not. Enjoy.

post/40122822143

photo 22:33:18
From The history of the Tube in pictures: 150 years of London Underground at the Telegraph:
8 March 1939: Some of the four million tickets collected from London Underground passengers are examined in a survey by London Transport to discover the most and least used routes to help future infrastructure development.
Nowadays, all they need to do is crunch the numbers from the automatic ticket machines to produce lists like this.
Picture: Gerry Cranham/Fox Photos/Getty Images. Link via Paul Clarke via Michael Smethurst.

From The history of the Tube in pictures: 150 years of London Underground at the Telegraph:

8 March 1939: Some of the four million tickets collected from London Underground passengers are examined in a survey by London Transport to discover the most and least used routes to help future infrastructure development.

Nowadays, all they need to do is crunch the numbers from the automatic ticket machines to produce lists like this.

Picture: Gerry Cranham/Fox Photos/Getty Images. Link via Paul Clarke via Michael Smethurst.

what

more

pages