notes.husk.org. scribblings by Paul Mison.

2013-10-23

post/64841647684

quote 05:32:45
“ The cyanometer is an incredible piece of graphic design: various shades of blue, or cyan, are arranged in a square that’s then held up to the sky. With the center of the paper cut out, you can gauge by direct approximation which shade of cyan matches the sky above, from overcast white to cloudless summer blue. ”

2012-04-13

post/21030156213

photos 18:08:00

Self-Portraits by Dukno Yoon (via ffffound):

This project is based on my formal study of face, in which I simplify face to lines. Composed directly from and on face, using steel wire with tension, these sculptures have kinetic potentialities due to the dynamics of the human face.

2012-03-19

post/19560814769

photo 05:00:06
Space Suits by San Diego Air & Space Museum Archives on Flickr:
Catalog #: 08_001663 Description: Garrett Corp Crew Systems EVA Branch Format: Glossy Photo
NASA seems to have been keen on using sport to test suits. There’s video of a game of football, comparing the soft and hard suits in a competitive trial. (via)

Space Suits by San Diego Air & Space Museum Archives on Flickr:

Catalog #: 08_001663
Description: Garrett Corp Crew Systems EVA Branch
Format: Glossy Photo

NASA seems to have been keen on using sport to test suits. There’s video of a game of football, comparing the soft and hard suits in a competitive trial. (via)

2012-03-15

post/19327762627

photo 03:15:05
roomthily (via):

Great Trigonometrical Survey of India, from Börner’s Atlas of Science

As commented on at the original poster, deconcrete:

Drawing the first cartographic representation of an uncharted land was very much linked in colonial times to claiming rights of sovereignty over the place. The stunning and meticulous Great Trigonometrical Survey (GTS) of India from the 18th century developed by Col. Lambton and Sir George Everest among others proofed a very efficient tool of control. In Mapping an Empire: the geographical construction of British India 1765-1843, Matthew H. Edney relates how imperial Britain employed modern scientific survey techniques not only to create and define the spatial image of its Indian empire but also to legitimate its colonialist activities as triumphs of liberal, rational science bringing ‘civilization’ to irrational, mystical, and despotic Indians. The reshaping of cartographic technologies in Europe into their modern form, including the adoption of the technique of triangulation (known at the time as ‘trigonometrical survey’) at the beginning of the nineteenth century, played a key role in the use of the GTS as an instrument of British cartographic control over India.

roomthily (via):

Great Trigonometrical Survey of India, from Börner’s Atlas of Science

As commented on at the original poster, deconcrete:

Drawing the first cartographic representation of an uncharted land was very much linked in colonial times to claiming rights of sovereignty over the place. The stunning and meticulous Great Trigonometrical Survey (GTS) of India from the 18th century developed by Col. Lambton and Sir George Everest among others proofed a very efficient tool of control. In Mapping an Empire: the geographical construction of British India 1765-1843, Matthew H. Edney relates how imperial Britain employed modern scientific survey techniques not only to create and define the spatial image of its Indian empire but also to legitimate its colonialist activities as triumphs of liberal, rational science bringing ‘civilization’ to irrational, mystical, and despotic Indians. The reshaping of cartographic technologies in Europe into their modern form, including the adoption of the technique of triangulation (known at the time as ‘trigonometrical survey’) at the beginning of the nineteenth century, played a key role in the use of the GTS as an instrument of British cartographic control over India.

2009-08-08

2009-06-21

post/127453352

quote 10:19:00
“ We are doing everything possible to create a global market with as much commonality and interoperability as possible, but NASA still can’t make the jump to metric ”

Mike Gold, of Bigelow Aerospace, quoted in a New Scientist story, NASA attacked for sticking to imperial units. (Edit to correct link, to a much longer version)

It concludes “NASA says that the $370 million cost to convert the Constellation programme to metric is too high.” Have these people not read all the bitchy asides in science fiction novels about how deep-future Man is still cursing feet and inches? Come on, NASA, get a grip.

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