notes.husk.org. scribblings by Paul Mison.

2013-12-20

post/70568757226

quote 07:25:21
“ Fletcher Previn, 39, is his mother’s protector. He built his first computer at age 13, and he painstakingly Photoshopped Woody Allen out of every single family photo and edited him out of family videos so that none of them would ever have to see him again. “We can look at them and be reminded of the good and not be reminded of the bad,” he told me. ”

2013-12-04

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photo 20:14:01
Mars Station (via sparkyrobot):

Dividing lines Part 6 - 1/3
Shot with a Infrared converted digital Camera, with a 720nm infrared pass filter.
"It is the pervading law of all things organic and inorganic, of all things physical and metaphysical, of all things human and all things superhuman, of all true manifestations of the head, of the heart, of the soul, that the life is recognizable in its expression, that form ever follows function. This is the law.” - Louis Sullivan

IF pylon THEN reblog

Mars Station (via sparkyrobot):

Dividing lines Part 6 - 1/3

Shot with a Infrared converted digital Camera, with a 720nm infrared pass filter.

"It is the pervading law of all things organic and inorganic, of all things physical and metaphysical, of all things human and all things superhuman, of all true manifestations of the head, of the heart, of the soul, that the life is recognizable in its expression, that form ever follows function. This is the law.” Louis Sullivan

IF pylon THEN reblog

2013-11-27

post/68279804775

quote 18:23:00
“ It’s annoying that Aperture owns all of my photos, and there’s no IMAP-like protocol for keeping my photos in the cloud forever, being able to hop between applications and code my own custom views and actions against an API. ”

Matt Webb for The Setup (via).

I would also like this. Sadly, the way the industry’s going, and given the failure of EverPix, I don’t think it’s likely to show up as a commercial product. Shame.

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photo 00:40:25
ABC News, Migration Formations of a Different Medium (via slavin):

At first, the works of Alain Delorme capture the magic of the first fleeting beauty of a flock of birds, a murmuration. However, this initial charm soon vanishes when the viewer takes a closer look, notices the clever deception, and discovers what is really behind the graceful flocks: thousands of plastic bags, meticulously arranged by the artist.

ABC News, Migration Formations of a Different Medium (via slavin):

At first, the works of Alain Delorme capture the magic of the first fleeting beauty of a flock of birds, a murmuration. However, this initial charm soon vanishes when the viewer takes a closer look, notices the clever deception, and discovers what is really behind the graceful flocks: thousands of plastic bags, meticulously arranged by the artist.

2013-11-22

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quote 17:22:51
“ I felt a lot of pride in being a part of Flickr at one time, and I still do- it’s still one of the web’s jewels with a wealth of beautiful content, but the social aspect of Flickr is just a shell of what it was, to me. ”

2013-11-13

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quote 00:27:28
“ you can only use the front-facing camera on your phone in Shots Of Me. It’s like Instagram, but with half of it missing, no filters, a worse name, and the possibility of [enriching] Justin Bieber. ”

2013-11-08

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photo 18:33:55
TBM Elizabeth breaks through into Stepney Green cavern November 2013, from Crossrail’s site.
Posted mainly for the various people photographing it on their phones. Also, is that an iPad towards the right?

TBM Elizabeth breaks through into Stepney Green cavern November 2013, from Crossrail’s site.

Posted mainly for the various people photographing it on their phones. Also, is that an iPad towards the right?

post/66334874883

photos 02:34:41

Kodak “Shirley” cards. from Chopped Liver Press’s coverage of To Photograph The Details Of A Dark Horse In Low Light, a show late last year in London and earlier this in Johannesberg:

“At the time film emulsions were developing, the target consumer market would have been ‘Caucasians’ in a segregated political scene,” says Roth. “Their skin tones would have been less likely to be the basis for thinking about dynamic range, because most subjects in a photograph would either have been all light- skinned or all darker-skinned.” This invisible science was visually buttressed by Kodak’s early, racially biased colour-balancing reference cards. Introduced in the 1940s as an aid for laboratory technicians measuring and calibrating skin tones, these test cards (or plotting sheets) featured a white model wearing a colourful, high-contrast dress. Further defining hallmarks of these cards, which are now collectible and traded online, was an abstract co- lour grid and verbal caption stating the film type together with the word “normal.”

From the exhibition description:

The title of Broomberg and Chanarin’s new solo exhibition at Paradise Row was originally the coded phrase used by Kodak to describe the capabilities of a new film stock developed in the early 80’s to address the inability of their earlier films to accurately render dark skin.

Jean-Luc Godard famously refused to use Kodak film during an assignment to Mozambique in 1977, on the grounds that the film stock was inherently ‘racist’.

The exhibition also touches on Polaroid’s involvement with apartheid:

As she walked through her office building one day, Caroline Hunter noticed something strange — a mock-up of a South African passbook.

At the time, Hunter knew little about South Africa, a country on the other side of the world from her workplace in Cambridge, Mass. But she knew about apartheid, and understood that this enlarged photo identification card meant something was not right.

The Guardian quotes Broomberg, one of the artists involved:

The artists feel certain that the ID-2 camera and its boost button were Polaroid’s answer to South Africa’s very specific need. “Black skin absorbs 42% more light. The button boosts the flash exactly 42%,” Broomberg explained. “It makes me believe it was designed for this purpose.”

Instead of identity photographs of people, they photographed aloe plants.

(via notational / agabond)

2013-10-29

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photo 13:11:41
Scott Smith, in Looking the Future in the Eyes:

You get a photo to post to your carefully groomed social media profiles for some social status. It’s like one of those novelty Wild West photo studios, except you’re dressing up as a Silicon Valley elite.

Scott Smith, in Looking the Future in the Eyes:

You get a photo to post to your carefully groomed social media profiles for some social status. It’s like one of those novelty Wild West photo studios, except you’re dressing up as a Silicon Valley elite.

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