notes.husk.org. scribblings by Paul Mison.

2014-02-19

post/77189289122

photo 18:08:20
brucesterling:

*When the NSA was young

More like GCHQ, assuming IWM is Imperial War Museum and hence that this is British. Still, worth reblogging if only because it looks good.

brucesterling:

*When the NSA was young

More like GCHQ, assuming IWM is Imperial War Museum and hence that this is British. Still, worth reblogging if only because it looks good.

2013-12-04

post/69001083104

quote 20:16:50
“ Many radio stations broadcast birdsong, city-traffic or other atmospheric comfort noise during periods of deliberate silence. For example, in the UK, silence is observed on Remembrance Sunday, and London’s quiet city ambiance is used. This is to reassure the listener that the station is on-air, but primarily to prevent silence detection systems at transmitters from automatically starting backup tapes of music (designed to be broadcast in the case of transmission link failure). ”

2013-05-20

post/50922018781

quote 19:35:07
“ Here comes the Royal Family now. The automobile has now stopped….
Oh, there’s the King — he’s stepping out, followed by her Majesty Queen Elizabeth, nattily attired in a silver coat. Mr. King is now shaking hands with the King and introducing Mr. Queen to the King and Queen and then Mrs. Queen to the Queen and King. They are now proceeding up the steps to the well-decorated City Hall, the King and Mr. King together with the Queen being escorted by Mrs. Queen. The King has now stopped and said something to Mrs. Queen and goes to Mrs. Queen and the Queen and Mr. King and the Queen laughed jovially. The King leaves Mr. King and goes to Mrs. Queen, and the Queen and Mr. King follow behind… ”

From CBC Radio report of the 1939 visit of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth to Winnipeg, where they were greeted by Prime Minister Mackenzie King and Winnipeg Mayor John Queen and Mrs. Queen.

Royal Moments in Broadcasting (via anglepoised)

(via anglepoised-stream)

2013-04-29

2012-09-22

2012-04-09

post/20795381027

photo 21:19:32
The first appearance of the “computer-generated illustration produced at the Arecibo Radio Observatory in Puerto Rico” of pulsar CP1919 (now known as PSR B1919+21), credited to Jerry Ostriker, in Scientific American’s January 1971 issue.
The image is best known as the album art for Joy Division’s Unknown Pleasures, as appropriated by Peter Saville, but this post (by Adam Capriola) is the most thorough attempt I’ve ever seen to go into its history.

The first appearance of the “computer-generated illustration produced at the Arecibo Radio Observatory in Puerto Rico” of pulsar CP1919 (now known as PSR B1919+21), credited to Jerry Ostriker, in Scientific American’s January 1971 issue.

The image is best known as the album art for Joy Division’s Unknown Pleasures, as appropriated by Peter Saville, but this post (by Adam Capriola) is the most thorough attempt I’ve ever seen to go into its history.

2012-04-03

post/20430297649

photo 23:28:12
Australis Oscar V, an amateur radio satellite. Alice Gorman, Saving space junk, our cultural heritage in orbit:

Space heritage isn’t all about the superpowers, though. In 1970, a small striped box representing the ambitions and dreams of a bunch of Melbourne University students was launched into low-earth orbit, piggybacked on a NASA rocket.
The students had designed the satellite – dubbed Australis Oscar V – and constructed it from begged, borrowed and scrounged components. They then coordinated amateur radio enthusiasts across the world to collect data from the satellite. Australis Oscar V transmitted data for six epic weeks until its batteries died.

Australis Oscar V, an amateur radio satellite. Alice Gorman, Saving space junk, our cultural heritage in orbit:

Space heritage isn’t all about the superpowers, though. In 1970, a small striped box representing the ambitions and dreams of a bunch of Melbourne University students was launched into low-earth orbit, piggybacked on a NASA rocket.

The students had designed the satellite – dubbed Australis Oscar V – and constructed it from begged, borrowed and scrounged components. They then coordinated amateur radio enthusiasts across the world to collect data from the satellite. Australis Oscar V transmitted data for six epic weeks until its batteries died.

2012-03-31

post/20204828678

quote 03:46:00

You never forget the first time you see RAF Fylingdales, usually as you’re tootling along the A169 gently in thrall to the natural wonders of the North Yorkshire Moors. Could anything be more incongruous than those vast, dimpled radomes, those eerie ’golf balls’, blistering out of the green surroundings? It’s a sort of rude-awakening, where you’re reminded the world is less a James Herriot novel and more a Noam Chomsky essay. As the comedian Mark Thomas famously said, “It’s like giant Tarby has found his pitch and putt.”

For a 10-year-old, the sight is disconcerting and strange. But when the coach driver passes as close as the barbed-wire and steel allows him and, with a certain devilish glee, slows right down and turns his radio up, revealing a barrage of crackling static, stuck signals and unworldly whistling, strange turns to frightening.

2012-02-24

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photo 23:24:06
More from Ptak Science Books: Fantastic Cover Art: a Picture of the Future of Television:
This image is that of the television antenna of station WNBT and for many years it sat on top of the Empire State Building. WNBT was the flagship station of NBC, which was owned by RCA (Radio Corporation of America, 1919-1986) which (according to its name) was really the first national broadcasting radio network in the United States, and which (as experimental station W2XBS) became the first to broadcast a television picture (of a papier mache Felix the Cat) in 1928. This fantastic cover art for a 1947 promotional for the company pictured the famous antenna, the great visual of the company’s external hardware, right there on top of the world’s tallest building.

More from Ptak Science BooksFantastic Cover Art: a Picture of the Future of Television:

This image is that of the television antenna of station WNBT and for many years it sat on top of the Empire State Building. WNBT was the flagship station of NBC, which was owned by RCA (Radio Corporation of America, 1919-1986) which (according to its name) was really the first national broadcasting radio network in the United States, and which (as experimental station W2XBS) became the first to broadcast a television picture (of a papier mache Felix the Cat) in 1928. This fantastic cover art for a 1947 promotional for the company pictured the famous antenna, the great visual of the company’s external hardware, right there on top of the world’s tallest building.

2011-11-18

post/12973858060

quote 18:26:16
“ Jon seems aggrieved that he received £8 for 90,000 Spotify plays. However his mistake is to compare a Spotify play against a Radio 1 play. Radio 1 has approx 11,000,000 listeners so if you do the maths that’s 0.0000045p per listener. Spotify pays 0.000088p per stream (listener) according to Jon’s own figures above. So by Jon’s own maths, Spotify pays more. ”
Kieron Donoghue, on Spotify vs Radio 1 pay rates (via, via)

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