notes.husk.org. scribblings by Paul Mison.

2014-02-21

2014-02-10

post/76250673534

photos 20:56:52

A selection of images from Arc of Total Eclipse, February 26, 1979 by Sarah Charlesworth, from her series Modern History, which manipulates newspaper front pages.

Arc of Total Eclipse is, as the name implies, based on newspaper reports along the path of totality of that eclipse, which passed over the north-western United States and part of Canada.

In the Wall Street Journal obituary for Charlesworth, who died last year aged 66, Richard Woodward wrote

The 29 panels in “Arc of Total Eclipse, February 26, 1979” (1979) reproduce images of a total solar eclipse on front pages of newspapers along its path, from the Pacific Northwest to Greenland. Each image is slightly different, reflecting the various angles and times at which they were taken: an astronomic event interpreted locally through a technology—photography—that writes in the very sunlight that is the story’s subject.

2013-12-21

2013-11-22

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quote 01:21:49
“ The strategy is based on nodes with an accurate clock and light sensors that can regularly sample the level of light intensity. The measurements are fitted into a celestial model of the earth motion around the sun. By identifying the trajectory of the sun across the skies one can accurately determine sunrise and sunset times, and thus extract the longitude and latitude of the sensor. ”

A quote from the abstract of Sunlight Intensity Based Global Positioning System for Near-Surface Underwater Sensors, by Javier V. Gómez, Frode E. Sandnes, and Borja Fernández (via).

It’s obviously no use for finding location every second, and there’s a fair amount of inaccuracy shown on their graphs, but for long-lived drop-and-forget sensors, it’s a nice solution. Of course, as with all longitude-detecting hardware, it does rely on an accurate clock, but at least that’s a solved problem these days.

2013-10-11

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photo 21:06:42
SL3-114-1726, an image from the SkyLab 3 crew, on Earth Lens, the latest /dev/fort project.

SL3-114-1726, an image from the SkyLab 3 crew, on Earth Lens, the latest /dev/fort project.

2013-06-18

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photo 18:53:00
blakegopnik (via fette):

DAILY PIC: These two iPhones are all there is to “The Distance of a Day”, an installation by the young Brooklyner David Horvitz that I just saw at the Art Basel fair, in the booth of Berlin’s Chert gallery. Last February, Horvitz got his mom to record a video of the sunset over the sea near Los Angeles, where he was born and grew up. At the same moment that she was taping, he was at a point almost opposite her on the globe, in the Maldives, taping the same sun as it rose. There was something  poignant for me in imagining our great sun as a tenuous link between mother and son. There was also a kind of almost scientific rigor in the piece, as it demonstrated a basic truth of heliocentric astronomy. And, of course, it was also about virtuality: A deeply physical project that involves two people and the places they’re in comes to us care of an ephemeral digital record – in fact presented on the very phones that recorded the scenes. And I still can’t wrap my mind around the idea of a single object being photographed at the same instant from opposite sides of the globe.

There are times of the year when the sun is visible from both San Francisco and London for hours, and (in December) times when it’s only visible from both for half an hour. This seems like a nice idea for the latter.

blakegopnik (via fette):

DAILY PIC: These two iPhones are all there is to “The Distance of a Day”, an installation by the young Brooklyner David Horvitz that I just saw at the Art Basel fair, in the booth of Berlin’s Chert gallery. Last February, Horvitz got his mom to record a video of the sunset over the sea near Los Angeles, where he was born and grew up. At the same moment that she was taping, he was at a point almost opposite her on the globe, in the Maldives, taping the same sun as it rose. There was something  poignant for me in imagining our great sun as a tenuous link between mother and son. There was also a kind of almost scientific rigor in the piece, as it demonstrated a basic truth of heliocentric astronomy. And, of course, it was also about virtuality: A deeply physical project that involves two people and the places they’re in comes to us care of an ephemeral digital record – in fact presented on the very phones that recorded the scenes. And I still can’t wrap my mind around the idea of a single object being photographed at the same instant from opposite sides of the globe.

There are times of the year when the sun is visible from both San Francisco and London for hours, and (in December) times when it’s only visible from both for half an hour. This seems like a nice idea for the latter.

2013-02-20

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photo 08:08:31
Catherine Meyer: “The Shard transformed into a lighthouse”.

Catherine Meyer: “The Shard transformed into a lighthouse”.

(Source: twitter.com)

2012-12-31

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photo 20:01:55
Astronaut Takes Amazing Self Portrait in Space, (via meatrobot):

[Taken by] Aki Hoshide, [this] self portrait brings into one frame “the Sun, the Earth, two portions of a robotic arm, an astronaut’s spacesuit, the deep darkness of space, and the unusual camera taking the picture.”

As seen on Astronomy Picture Of The Day. Oddly, what grabbed me was the sensor flare around the sun in the top left.

Astronaut Takes Amazing Self Portrait in Space, (via meatrobot):

[Taken by] Aki Hoshide, [this] self portrait brings into one frame “the Sun, the Earth, two portions of a robotic arm, an astronaut’s spacesuit, the deep darkness of space, and the unusual camera taking the picture.”

As seen on Astronomy Picture Of The Day. Oddly, what grabbed me was the sensor flare around the sun in the top left.

2012-03-19

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photo 15:05:05
The London Eye in fog, on March 15th. Photograph: Andrew Winning / Reuters. (via, via)

The London Eye in fog, on March 15th. Photograph: Andrew Winning / Reuters. (viavia)

2012-03-15

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photos 23:53:21

Six works from The Outward And Visible Signs, Robert Longo. Charcoal on mounted paper, rearranged in decreasing order of the pictured object’s size. (viapreviously)

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