notes.husk.org. scribblings by Paul Mison.

2012-04-11

post/20917253459

photo 20:57:45
webkitbits:

-webkit-filter is the new hotness, and it’s coming to your browser sooner than you’d expect!
This slide comes from a recent presentation given by Vincent Hardy of Adobe, showing off the rapid innovation in tweaking web graphics. Download the latest WebKit Nightly and take a look!
I recommend you view the whole presentation, but click here to go directly to the slide pictured above.

The filter aesthetic continues its apparently unstoppable march.

webkitbits:

-webkit-filter is the new hotness, and it’s coming to your browser sooner than you’d expect!

This slide comes from a recent presentation given by Vincent Hardy of Adobe, showing off the rapid innovation in tweaking web graphics. Download the latest WebKit Nightly and take a look!

I recommend you view the whole presentation, but click here to go directly to the slide pictured above.

The filter aesthetic continues its apparently unstoppable march.

2012-03-05

post/18768306182

photo 02:21:19
The Webkit inspector reporting on the size of a single post to Twitter, from a post by Michal Migurski:

Twitter allows you send 140 characters in a tweet, which (when you add entities, hashtags, and all that) ends up in the 4KB range as represented in the JSON API. 140 is what you see, so I’m going to go out on a limb and suggest that a single tweet page on Twitter has about a 15,000-to-one ratio of garbage to content.
I get links to tweets by mail, etc. on a regular basis, and the aggressive anti-performance and apparent contempt for the web by Twitter’s designers is probably the thing that gets me most irrationally riled-up on a daily basis. How does this pass design review? Who looks at a page this massive, this typically broken and says “go with it”?

The Webkit inspector reporting on the size of a single post to Twitter, from a post by Michal Migurski:

Twitter allows you send 140 characters in a tweet, which (when you add entities, hashtags, and all that) ends up in the 4KB range as represented in the JSON API. 140 is what you see, so I’m going to go out on a limb and suggest that a single tweet page on Twitter has about a 15,000-to-one ratio of garbage to content.

I get links to tweets by mail, etc. on a regular basis, and the aggressive anti-performance and apparent contempt for the web by Twitter’s designers is probably the thing that gets me most irrationally riled-up on a daily basis. How does this pass design review? Who looks at a page this massive, this typically broken and says “go with it”?

what

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